RIHIMA annual meeting — a good mix of HIM topics

Last week, I attended the annual meeting of the Rhode Island chapter of AHIMA. The event, held in Warwick, drew 70+ people as well as several vendors. It was a day filled with a wide variety of presentations, a delicious breakfast and lunch, and many opportunities for networking. The best part was that I only needed to travel 10 minutes from my home!

The day began with an overview of AHIMA’s strategic goals and initiatives. Tim J. Keough, MPA, RHIA, FAHIMA, of the AHIMA board of directors, spoke about the importance of data in healthcare — and why HIM is well-suited for the role of data analyst. He urged HIM professionals to lead the charge in the current data revolution — that is, to look for ways in which their organizations can turn data into health intelligence that can mitigate risk and improve outcomes.

Keough also talked about information governance through data transparency, data protection, and data integrity. As the industry continues to tap into big data for precision medicine, he said HIM should be at the forefront managing, using, and improving this data.

Cybersecurity expert, John H. Rogers, CISSP, gave a great presentation on the growing risk that hackers pose to health information privacy and security. “Healthcare information is more valuable than any other information on the market,” he said.

HIM professionals must make cybersecurity a core mission of the organization. This requires ongoing staff education, virus protection/patch updates, and social engineering testing. “It’s not just about the technology. Situational awareness is your power,” he said.

On the coding side, Barry Libman, MS, RHIA, CDIP, CCS, CCS-P, CIC, provided a helpful overview of important ICD-10-CM/PCS changes that will go into effect for FY 2017 on October 1, 2016. In particular, there are 3,651 new PCS codes (many of which are cardio-related) and 1,943 new CM codes, including a new code for the Zika virus (A92.5).

Attorney Jennifer Cox, JD gave an update on the ever-evolving Meaningful Use (MU) program, urging attendees to perform a security risk analysis if they haven’t done so already. Cox said this analysis is the number one reason providers fail to meet MU criteria.

David L. Rousseau, director of cancer information systems at the Hospital Association of Rhode Island, talked about the importance of cancer registries and why this is a good fit for HIM.

Perhaps the most riveting presentation was given by Michael G. Cooley, executive director of Nalari Health. Cooley shared his personal journey to overcome many challenges and hardships to ultimately find success both personally and professionally. His story, which also serves as the basis for his memoir “Rock Bottom: From the Streets To Success,” was extremely inspirational and unexpected. It also serves as a reminder of the strength of the human spirit — a good lesson for all of us.

 

Advertisements