The *perks* of working from home

For many of us, the idea of working from home conjures up images of individuals hanging out in pajamas and slippers past noon, taking long breaks to watch game shows and soap operas — or perhaps not even ‘working’ at all. I’ve always found this to be an odd assumption considering I’ve worked far more diligently since establishing my home office than I ever did while working onsite. As a self-employed freelance writer, I put my nose to the grindstone daily, though I must admit I do it while wearing orthotic leopard-patterned slippers.

Can you blame me?

Still, working remotely wasn’t something offered to me at the onset of my writing career. I worked for several years in a cubicle —  constantly distracted by others’ conversations (and drama). When my previous employer eventually told me I would have my own private office, I had to pinch myself. Was it a dream or reality? Luckily, it was reality, and once settled in, I could shut the door, dim the lights, and get my work done in half the time it would have taken me to do so before. It wasn’t until nearly five years later (when I relocated to a different state) that this same employer offered me the option to work remotely from home. Of course, I said yes — and even turned down another job offer because of it.

Once I got a taste of working from home, I knew there would be no going back.

Why? First off, I’m happier. There’s more space, and it’s my space. Second, the quality of my writing improved because I was able to focus. Third, I could accomplish more work in an average 8-hour workday even despite the fact that it didn’t feel as though I was over-extending myself.

I’d like to think that the same holds true for medical coders who work from home. Medical coding is a profession that has increasingly embraced remote work arrangements in an age of electronic health records (EHR). Remote coders with whom I’ve spoken love working from home, and many view it as an ideal scenario.

Still, remote work isn’t for everyone. I’ve interviewed many coding managers and HIM directors who say it’s not even possible in some circumstances. Following are some questions to consider before allowing an employee to work from home:

  1. Does the employee have sufficient Internet access and speed to support remote access to the EHR?
  2. Does the employee have a quiet working environment and dedicated work/office space at home?
  3. Is the employee self-motivated? If so, how has he or she demonstrated this?
  4. Has the employee already met productivity and accuracy standards?
  5. Will working from home improve the employee’s job satisfaction?

While you ponder these questions, I’m going to go pour another cup of coffee and get started on my next article…all from the comfort of my home office with my only co-worker (my cat) by my side.